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Feature #16031

Raise ArgumentError when creating Time objects with invalid day of month, instead of rolling into next month

Added by aliism (Ali Ismayilov) about 1 year ago. Updated 3 months ago.

Status:
Open
Priority:
Normal
Assignee:
-
Target version:
-
[ruby-core:94079]

Description

When parsing an invalid date, like February 31 or November 31, I get different results from Date and Time classes.

require 'date'
require 'time'

Date.strptime('2019-02-31', '%Y-%m-%d')
# Traceback (most recent call last):
#         5: from /Users/ali/.rbenv/versions/2.6.3/bin/irb:23:in `<main>'
#         4: from /Users/ali/.rbenv/versions/2.6.3/bin/irb:23:in `load'
#         3: from /Users/ali/.rbenv/versions/2.6.3/lib/ruby/gems/2.6.0/gems/irb-1.0.0/exe/irb:11:in `<top (required)>'
#         2: from (irb):5
#         1: from (irb):5:in `strptime'
# ArgumentError (invalid date)

Time.strptime('2019-02-31', '%Y-%m-%d')
# => 2019-03-03 00:00:00 +0100

I'd expect Time class to throw ArgumentError, just like the Date class.

Updated by sawa (Tsuyoshi Sawada) about 1 year ago

Perhaps, an option to chose between the two kinds of behavior may be useful for both Date and Time. Something like exception: (true raises exception) or rollover: (true suppresses exception).

Updated by jeremyevans0 (Jeremy Evans) 4 months ago

  • Backport deleted (2.5: UNKNOWN, 2.6: UNKNOWN)
  • ruby -v deleted (ruby 2.6.3p62 (2019-04-16 revision 67580) [x86_64-darwin18])
  • Subject changed from Inconsistency between Date::strptime and Time::strptime at the end of a month to Raise ArgumentError when creating Time objects with invalid day of month, instead of rolling into next month
  • Tracker changed from Bug to Feature

This is not related to strptime specifically, this is how Time behaves generally:

Time.local(2020, 2, 31)
# => 2020-03-02 00:00:00 -0800
Time.parse("2020-02-31")
# => 2020-03-02 00:00:00 -0800

This behavior isn't a bug, it is by design: https://github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/ee35a4dad30eaf74064d5c38bfdfb3550998bb8f/time.c#L3056-L3076

So I'm switching this to a feature request to change Time to raise ArgumentError for invalid day of month, instead of rolling into the next month.

Updated by Dan0042 (Daniel DeLorme) 3 months ago

It's true that this behavior is due to how Time behaves generally, but I think this is a valid bug report specifically related to strptime. I don't think the OP was really asking for a change in the rollover behavior of Time#local, just that strptime should not behave like that.

As far as I understand the rollover is meant to deal with Time arithmetic, so we can change the year/month, and the day will automagically adjust. But for Time parsing, if you have the string "2019-02-31" it should fail parsing imho.

Updated by jeremyevans0 (Jeremy Evans) 3 months ago

Dan0042 (Daniel DeLorme) wrote in #note-3:

It's true that this behavior is due to how Time behaves generally, but I think this is a valid bug report specifically related to strptime. I don't think the OP was really asking for a change in the rollover behavior of Time#local, just that strptime should not behave like that.

As far as I understand the rollover is meant to deal with Time arithmetic, so we can change the year/month, and the day will automagically adjust. But for Time parsing, if you have the string "2019-02-31" it should fail parsing imho.

I disagree. Time.parse and Time.strptime should remain consistent with other Time constructors. Either all constructors should be strict and reject the dates, or none of the constructors should. Barring backwards compatibility issues, I think it would be best to make all constructors strict. However, I don't think the benefits of doing so outweigh the backwards compatibility break.

For what its worth, anyone doing time arithmetic at the day/year/month level is better off using Date/DateTime. Date's arithmetic makes more sense, clamping to the end of the month instead of spilling into the next month. It also offers a nicer API.

Date.new(2001, 1, 31) >> 1
# => #<Date: 2001-02-28 ((2451969j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>

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